Physical

Or Cardio-Vascular (CV) FITNESS

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If you were asked to improve only one area of physical fitness, which would you are choose –Flexibility, strength or cardio –Vascular CV endurance? Which would a fitness guru recommend?.... CV wins.

I think that the experts, exercise physiologists would say that aerobic fitness is of greatest impotence. These experts regard enhancement of your heart, lung, and blood function to be the most important aspects of your fitness. Your life depends on the capacity of your heart, blood vessels, and lungs to deliver nutrients and oxygen to your tissue and remove wastes.

You know that inability to supply muscles with adequate oxygen, nutrients, and waste removal severely limits a muscle’s ability to function. This is true for other organs of the body. Aerobic exercise increases your capacity to supply and utilize oxygen and hence your body can exercise longer and at a greater level of intensity. The aerobically fit people take in, transport and use oxygen in the most efficient manner possible muscle fatigue or the inability of a muscle to continue adequate exercise intensity produces unpleasant sensations that force you to stop the exercise.

Muscle fatigue is the result of several factors like depletion of glycogen stores in the affected muscles, lowering of PH level in the blood , accumulation of lactic acid , local muscular fatigue, and some psychological factors.

It is highly desirable to undertake an activity of low intensity but for a longer duration. These build up your ability to maintain aerobic energy production. Even activities that are generally associated with aerobic energy release (walking, jogging and bicycle touring) become anaerobic activities when they are either increased in intensity or continued for an extended period. In an unfit person this will happen at a lower intensity and ager less time as compared with an aerobically fit person. Aerobic exercises (walking, Running, jogging, cycling, and aerobic dancing) best develop cardiovascular endurance when done regularly. To choose and successfully develop a program for development of aerobic endurance, learn the basics of fitness sciences. Read on.

Recommendations for Aerobic Exercise

To be of benefit to the cardiovascular CV system, exercise should be rhythmic or dynamic and involve a considerable part of the body‘s muscle mass. Aerobic exercises that are most beneficial to develop your CV system are walking, jogging, running, cycling, swimming, rope-skipping, skating, ice skating, roller skating , hiking, rowing and various endurance game activities.

Based on current research concerning exercise prescription for healthy adults and the need for guidelines, the following recommendations hold good for the quantity and quality of training for developing and maintaining cardio-respiratory, fitness and body composition in the healthy adult.
 

  • Frequency : 3-5 times per week.
  • Duration : minimum 15 minutes, preferably 20 to 30 minutes or even more (up to 100 minutes as in a walking program when weight loss is desired). Duration is dependent on the intensity of the activity, thus lower intensity activity (like moderate pace walking) should be conducted over a longer period of time. Because of the importance of the ‘total fitness’ effect and the fact that it is more readily attained in longer duration programs, and because of the potential hazards (injuries, safely of the heart, etc) and compliance problems associated with high intensity activity, lower to moderate intensity activity of longer duration (30 mins to 1hour or more) is recommended for non-athletic adult and elder citizens.
  • Method: Done continuously without stopping
  • Tempo/ Rate or intensity: Heart rate (Preferably 75% but not more than 90% or, 50-85% of maximum oxygen uptake –VO2 max). Exercising at a heart rate below 50% of your maximal heart rate may give very little aerobic benefits. However, it may still help in improving your body composition (fat loss) and improve your overall fitness if you are very unfit. To get the ‘Perfect Fitness Program’ add 30-50minutes of strength exercises or a weight training workout per week along with 10-15 minutes of stretching exercises daily.


STANDARD EXERCISE PRESCRIPTION

  • Summery for keeping aerobic fitness
  • Frequency of training: 3-5 days per week.
  • Duration of training: 15-60 minutes of continuous aerobic activity: using 300-500 k cal per session.
  • Which activity: Any activity that uses large muscle groups (legs & trunk) that can be maintained continuously, and is rhythmical and aerobic in nature.
  • Intensity of training: 60%-90% of maximal heart rate.


Aerobic Exercises - definition

Aerobic means that oxygen uptake, transport and utilization are improved with regular training. Aerobic exercises are those that safely and comfortably increased your breathing and heart rates for an extended period of time, (Usually over 20 minutes) without disturbing the balance between your intake and use of oxygen. In contrast, activities that require sudden, excessive bursts of energy are anaerobic.

Aerobic or Cardiovascular CV Fitness
The ability or the heart, blood vessels, blood, and respiratory system to supply fuel, especially oxygen, to the muscles during sustained exercise. A fit person can persist in physical activity for relatively long periods of time without undue stress.



THE TALK TEST

The most practical and easy method of checking whether you are exercising aerobically is the ‘talk test’. During aerobic exercise you should be able to carry out a conversation, which may be somewhat staccato, with a companion. If you cannot talk during exercise then it cannot be aerobic: your heart rate is likely to have soared well above 150 beats a minutes and you will be exercising ‘ anaerobically’ ( without oxygen). The result will be that you will get out or breath, exercise, will become uncomfortable and you will have slow down to an aerobic level of exercise, or stop.

Becoming too breathless to speak indicates that you’re ‘pushing too hard’ and are likely to ‘feel the burnt’ Contrary! To the popular belief, you don’t have to exercise vigorously to get food aerobic training effect. Remember the rule that as long as you talk you couldn’t be exercising too hard for you sate of aerobic fitness.


Article is copied from Health Fitness Society
Dr. Sunita Godara

THE ULTIMATE EXERCISE WORKOUT PROGRAM

Description from the ground up to the key features that should be present the soundest, most effective aerobic programs are given here. After you actually get started, any safe, effective aerobic programs you choose should include at least these 4 basic phases.

Phase 1: WARMUP & STRECHING
This is the first step in each of your exercise sessions. Always warm-up before you work out. You may be in a hurry and eager but take the time to warm-up. You should never jump into your exercise session without doing warm-up. Do some simple limbering exercises, flexing each muscle against the opposite to get the circulation going and promote flexibility or simply jog in place, run around the track two to three laps, or stretch yourself. We recommend that you spend at least 5-10 minutes stretching and getting your muscles warm.

Some Benefits of WARM-UP

  • Begin with undemanding exercises, such as swinging your arms and hips and gently stretching your back, legs and other muscle groups.
  • Slowly move into a more vigorous warm-up perhaps with some 8 to 10 exercises like jumping jacks or running in place for 2-3 minutes.
  • Finally devote some time to do the planned activity itself (say, slow running for a jogger) slowly increasing the pace. Do more exercises to loosen up any group of muscles, which may be feeling stiff on any day.

In short, it is important to stretch out muscles before you embark on any form of exercise in order to avoid stiffness and injury. It is foolish to risk your health because you get impatient or are late in joining a class and to get right into your workout. Give your body a chance to slowly adapt itself from its resting state so that it can face some tough challenges later, when you engage more in strenuous aerobic phase of your program.

  • Heart, if launched into sudden action, may react with abnormal rhythms that can kill an untrained person.
  • Warm-up makes exercise much easier and allows the person to adjust psychologically for the activity ahead.
  • It raises the body and muscle temperatures, increasing the metabolism or skeletal muscles and increases blood supply and oxygen to the muscles. Dissociation of oxygen from haemoglobin and myoglobin is increased.
  • It also increases blood supply to the heart.
  • With more nutrients from the increased blood supply, muscles become more elastic, thus reducing the risk of sprains and tears. A stretched muscle is less prone to injuries.
  • The higher temperatures improve contraction and reflex times of skeletal muscles and reduce muscle viscosity.
  • For the unfit persons warm-up helps in conditioning the body.

    On a day when you feel like dodging exercise do your warm-up and then see how you feel. Going through an established routine may change your mind.


PHASE-2: AEROBIC EXERCISE
This is the part of your session that will provide you aerobic benefits. You’re striving here to raise your pulse rate to your target heart rate and maintain it there for at least 20 minutes if you’re exercising 4 times a week. If you exercise 3 times a week, the minimum for each aerobic section should be 30 minutes, totaling up to 80-120 min per week.

PHASE-3 : THE COOL-DOWN
It is not advisable to stop suddenly after intense physical activity, particularly if you have kicked-in at the end of your aerobic section, because of the build-up of lactic acid in muscles which can cause stiffness and even a heart attack in some people with cardiac abnormalities. Bring your organism back to normal gradually. Be sure you don’t ignore this phase and spend at least 5 minutes cooling down.
If activity stops suddenly then blood tends to ‘pool’ the extremities especially legs instead of getting back to heart because muscle contractions in the leg muscles stop. Your heart is still pumping hard, but no blood is going up and hence it is starved of blood. This places extra stress on the heart and the not-so-fit or older persons with a weak heart may be endangering their lives if they do not cool-down gradually.

On slowing down gradually, the muscles continue to assist in pumping up the blood until the stress on your heart subsides, which will be apparent by a fall in your pulse rate to about 100 beats. What this means is that, don’t stop suddenly, slacken your efforts gradually. You should keep walking and moving about until your heart-rate drops to less than 120 beats per minute, or less than 100 if you are over 50 years of age. This means that you will spend at least 5 minutes cooling down. And remember: take longer if you’ve ended your aerobic phase in a final Bust of speed or your heart rate stays higher than 100 at the end of the 5-minute recovery. If it stays high you should not exercise as vigorously or as long the next time out.

In fact, this heart rate response in recovery after exercise is more accurate than ‘safe heart range’ in measuring whether the exercise is safe. The physiologists advocate that for optimal recovery the warm-up tempo should be 40-60 percent of your VO2 max or ‘maximum oxygen utilization capacity’ that simply means that you should keep moving at a moderate pace to cool-down.

The worst possible strategy for exercise cessation would be that you stop exercising abruptly and stand. The best strategy would be that you reduce the intensity gradually. Anyone who stops vigorous exercise abruptly is endangering his heart and may be flirting with sudden death. The circulatory system, in a sense, goes ‘out of balance’ as the flow of blood slows down whereas the heart keeps beating faster due to the stimulating action of natural heart stimulants, epinephrine and nor epinephrine, whose level continues to rise triggering potentially dangerous, irregular heart beats after strenuous exercise, and perhaps even lead to death. It takes a while for this natural ‘hyping-up’ of the exerciser’s body to slow down – a fact that has important implications for the safest way to end an endurance workout. In short, the body must be allowed to return gradually to its pre exercise state.
AFTER you’ve completed the most vigorous part of your workout, follows these all important don’ts :

  • Don’t sit or stand still.
  • Don’t stand motion less while taking your pulse whether during the aerobic phase or during the cool – down period. When you check it, keep moving.
  • Don’t get distracted & start talking with friends to the extent that you forget to keep moving.
  • Don’t come to a complete halt at a stop sign or stoplight when exercising on the road. I recommend that you continue to run in place or jog a short distance back & forth at the corner until the traffic clears or the light changes.

    A cool down routine also helps to avoid stiffness, which is felt by many after the exercise. During vigorous exercise the muscle fibres sustain microscopic tears. As these heal, inflexible scars tissue forms. Left on its own, you’ll stiffen as its heals, but if you stretch it with yoga type stretching exercises as it forms, you’ll keep your muscles flexible & efficient. Also, the body on exercising strenuously generate waste products: mainly lactic acid from the chemical reactions that trigger working muscles, broken muscle tissue.
    As the blood flow recedes suddenly, the waste is left behind. If it remains, you’ll be sore, but if you keep the heart & circulation exerting for a few minutes (40-60 percent of your VO2 max), they will pump it away.
    Reduce the level of activity gradually for 3-5 minutes or even more (say 10 minutes). Do yoga – type stretching exercises for five minutes at least.
    10- 15 minutes will more beneficial especially if you have worked harder than usual & stressed muscles you normally don’t in your work out.


PHASE 4: WEIGHT TRAINING & CALISTHENICS / EXERCISES
Normally, a session will and with 10 to 15 of special exercise to build up your muscles. Basic muscles strengthening Calisthenics such as push – ups, chin – ups, leg – lifts may be done after your aerobic workout or on alternate days.

It is advisable to do these at the end of aerobic phase although light, strengthening exercises may be used even before the work out as a part of warm –up phase. Trying doing these special strength – building exercises a minimum of 10 minutes a day, three times a week, or do a full weight –training session separately.

Special stress should be laid on building up abdominal strength in this phase by doing sit – ups. 3-5 sets of 10-15 repetitions may be done with every work out. Also, exercises stressing toning of specific body parts may be done for cosmetic reasons. If you want to feel strong then better to do strength training in a separate sessions. You may do weight training with free weights or with exercise machines for one hour every week.
Training with weights can also be done once or twice a week for 15-30 minutes after the aerobic phase of your workout.

BEFORE STARTING TO TRAIN FOR A HALF MARATHON, you need to possess a basic fitness level. And if you are over age 35, you probably should see your doctor for a physical examination. But assuming no major problems, most healthy people can train themselves to complete a 13.1-mile race.

The following schedule assumes you have the ability to run 3 miles, three to four times a week. If that seems difficult, consider a shorter distance for your first race--or take more time to develop an endurance base. For information on how to train for shorter distances, see my Beginning Runner's Guide or The 5-K Training Schedule on this Web site.

The terms used in the training schedule are somewhat obvious, but let me explain what I mean anyway. Further information and explanations are included in my InterActive Training Programs available through TrainingPeaks, where I send you daily emails telling you what to run and how to train.

Pace:
Don't worry about how fast you run your regular workouts. Run at a comfortable pace. If you're training with a friend, the two of you should be able to hold a conversation. If you can't do that, you're running too fast. (For those wearing heart rate monitors, your target zone should be between 65 and 75 percent of your maximum pulse rate.)

Distance:
The training schedule dictates workouts at distances, from 3 to 10 miles. Don't worry about running precisely those distances, but you should come close. Pick a course through the neighborhood, or in some scenic area where you think you might enjoy running. Then measure the course either by car or bicycle. In deciding where to train, talk to other runners. They probably can point you to some accurately measured courses for your workouts.
GPS watches seemingly make measuring courses easily, but trees and tall buildings sometimes can interfere with their accuracy.

Rest:
Rest is as important a part of your training as the runs. You will be able to run the long runs on the weekend better--and limit your risk of injury--if you rest before, and rest after.

Long Runs:
The key to getting ready to finish a Half Marathon is the long run, progressively increasing in distance each weekend. Over a period of 12 weeks, your longest run will increase from 3 to 10 miles. Don't worry about making the final jump from 10 miles in practice to 13.1 miles in the race. Inspiration will carry you to the finish line, particularly if you taper the final week. The schedule below suggests doing your long runs on Saturdays, but you can do them Sundays, or any other convenient day, as long as you are consistent. (See "Juggling," below.)

Cross-Train:
On the schedule above, this is identified simply as "cross." What form of cross-training works best? It could be swimming, cycling, walking (see below), cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, or even some combination that could include strength training if you choose to do it on Wednesdays and Saturdays instead of as indicated on the schedule. And feel free to throw in some jogging as well if you're feeling good. In fact, on Wednesdays I offer you the option to run or cross-train. What cross-training you select depends on your personal preference. But don't make the mistake of cross-training too vigorously. Sports such as basketball or volleyball that involve sideways motions or sudden stops and starts do not qualify as cross-training. In fact, you may increase your risk of injury if you double up on these sports, particularly as the mileage builds. Cross-training days should be considered easy days that allow you to recover from the running you do the rest of the week.

Walking:
Walking is an excellent exercise that a lot of runners overlook in their training. I don't specify walking breaks, but feel free to walk during your running workouts any time you feel tired or need to shift gears. When you go to the starting line in your twelfth week, nobody will care whether you run the full Half Marathon; they're more concerned that you finish! If this means walking every step in practice and in the race, do it! Be aware that I also offer a separate half marathon training program for those who plan to walk all the way.

Stretch & Strength:
Mondays are the days on which I advise you to spend extra time stretching--and do some strength training too. This is actually a day of "rest" following your long run on the weekends, so don't overdo it. It's wise to stretch every day, particularly after you finish your run, but spend more time stretching on Mondays. Strength training could consist of push-ups, pull-ups, use of free weights or working out with various machines at a health club. Runners generally benefit if they combine light weights with a high number of repetitions, rather than pumping very heavy iron. I also suggest that you strength train following your Thursday workouts, however you can schedule strength training on any two convenient days. If you have not strength trained before beginning this program, you may want to postpone starting that activity until after your race.

Take Time:
Does the 12-week progression from 3 to 13.1 miles seem too tough? Do you have more than a dozen weeks before your selected Half Marathon? Lengthen the schedule; take 18 or even 24 weeks to prepare. Repeat the week just completed before moving up to the next level. Don't be afraid to insert "stepback" weeks, where you actually cut your distance every second or third week to gather forces for the next push upward. To see how this "stepback" approach works, check out the training schedules for the marathon distance.

Racing:
It's not obligatory, but you might want to run a 5-K or 10-K to see how you're doing--and also to experience a road race, if you have not run one before. You will be able to use your times to predict your finishing time in the half marathon, and what pace to run that race. I have suggested a 5-K race at the end of Week 6 and a 10-K race at the end of Week 9. If you can't find races at those distances on the weeks suggested, feel free to modify the schedule.

Juggling:
Don't be afraid to juggle the workouts from day to day and week to week. If you have an important business meeting on Thursday, do that workout on Wednesday instead. If your family is going to be on vacation one week when you will have more or less time to train, adjust the schedule accordingly. Be consistent with your training, and the overall details won't matter.

Running 13.1 miles is not easy. If it were easy, there would be little challenge to an event such as the Half Marathon. Whether you plan your Half as a singular accomplishment or as a stepping stone to the even more challenging full marathon, crossing the finish line will give you a feeling of great accomplishment. Good luck with your training.

This Half Marathon training schedule is only a guide. Feel free to make minor modifications to suit your work and family schedule. Also, consider signing up for the interactive version of Novice 1 available from TrainingPeaks for more detailed information on what to run each day and tips for your training. I also have an app from BlueFin that you can download into your iPhone to assist you as you run.
 

Training for your first half

Week Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
1 Stretch & strengthen 3 m run 2 m run or cross 3 m run + strength Rest 30 min cross 4 min run
2 Stretch & strengthen 3 m run 2 m run or cross 3 m run + strength Rest 30 min cross 4 min run
3 Stretch & strengthen 3.5 m run 2 m run or cross 3.5 m run + strength Rest 40 min cross 5 min run
4 Stretch & strengthen 3.5 m run 2 m run or cross 3.5 m run + strength Rest 40 min cross 5 min run
5 Stretch & strengthen 4 m run 2 m run or cross 4 m run + strength Rest 40 min cross 6 min run
6 Stretch & strengthen 4 m run 2 m run or cross 4 m run + strength Rest or easy run Rest 5-K Race
7 Stretch & strengthen 4.5 m run 3 m run or cross 4.5 m run + strength Rest 50 min cross 7 min run
8 Stretch & strengthen 4.5 m run 3 m run or cross 4.5 m run + strength Rest 50 min cross 8 min run
9 Stretch & strengthen 5 m run 3 m run or cross 5 m run + strength Rest or easy run Rest 10-K Race
10 Stretch & strengthen 5 m run 3 m run or cross 5 m run + strength Rest 60 min cross 9 min run
11 Stretch & strengthen 5 m run 3 m run or cross 5 m run + strength Rest 60 min cross 10 min run
12 Stretch & strengthen 4 m run 3 m run or cross 30 min run Rest Rest Half Marathon

Half Marathon To Finish—for runners and walkers

This program is designed for those who have been doing some running or walking for a few weeks. If you think that you need more conditioning before starting the program, use the "Conditioning Program".

Note: This is the minimum that I’ve found necessary to finish with strength. If you are already running/walking more than this amount and are able to recover between workouts, you may continue to do what you are doing—but be careful.
 

  • I don’t recommend that first-time half marathon participants try for a time goal. Do the first one to finish, running/walking at a comfortable training pace.
  • To begin this program, you should have done a long run/walk within the past 2 weeks of at least 3 miles. If your long one is not this long, then gradually increase the weekend run/walk to this distance before starting this program.
  • (Runners) What is my current level of performance? Read the chapter in the book on "Choosing The Right Goal…". After you have run 3-4 "magic miles" (MM), multiply by 1.2. This tells you what you are currently capable of running in a half marathon right now (at a very hard effort), when the temperature is 60° F or below and when you have done the long runs listed in the schedule. Even in the half marathon itself, I don’t recommend running this fast—un at the training pace that was comfortable for you on your last long runs.
  • (Runners) What pace should I run on the long ones? Take your MM time and multiply by 1.3. Then add 2 minutes. The result is your suggested long run pace per mile on long runs at 60F or cooler. It is always better to run slower than this pace.
  • Walkers and runners should pace the long one so there’ no huffing and puffing—even at the end.
  • When the temperature rises above 60° F: runners slow down by 30 seconds a mile for every 5 degrees above 60° F. Walkers slow down enough to avoid huffing and puffing.
  • Run Walk Run ratio should correspond to the pace used (Runners).
    • min/mi—run 4 min/walk 35 seconds
    • min/mi— 4 min run-1 min walk
    • min/mi—-3:1
    • min/mi—2:30-1
    • min/mi—-2:1
    • min/mi—-1:1
    • min/mi—30 sec run/30 sec walk
    • min/mi—30 sec/45 sec
    • min/mi—30 sec/60 sec
  • Walkers use the walk-shuffle ratio that works for you to avoid huffing and puffing
  • It is fine to do cross training on Monday, Wednesday and Friday if you wish. There will be little benefit to your running/walking in doing this, but you’l increase your fatburning potential. Don’t do exercises like stair machines that use the calf muscle on cross training days.
  • Be sure to take a vacation from strenuous exercise on the day before your weekend runs/walks.
  • An optional pace run TT is noted on the Tuesday run. To get used to a pace you want to run in the race itself, time yourself for a mile, and take the walk breaks as you will do them in the race.

    Have Fun!


Half Marathon Training Schedule for Runners and Walkers

Week Monday Tuesday(TT) Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
1 Off 30 min run Off 25 min run easy walk Off 3 miles
2 Off 30 min run Off 30 min run easy walk Off 4 miles
3 Off 30 min run Off 30 min run easy walk Off 5 miles
4 Off 30 min run Off 30 min run easy walk Off 2.5 miles
5 Off 30 min run Off 30 min run easy walk Off 6.5 miles
6 Off 30 min run Off 30 min run easy walk Off 3 miles MM
7 Off 30 min run Off 30 min run easy walk Off 8 miles
8 Off 30 min run Off 30 min run easy walk Off 3 miles with MM
9 Off 30 min run Off 30 min run easy walk Off 9.5 miles
10 Off 30 min run Off 30 min run easy walk Off 4 miles
11 Off 30 min run Off 30 min run easy walk Off 11 miles
12 Off 30 min run Off 30 min run easy walk Off 4 miles with MM
13 Off 30 min run Off 30 min run easy walk Off 12.5 miles
14 Off 30 min run Off 30 min run easy walk Off 4 miles with MM
15 Off 30 min run Off 30 min run easy walk Off 14 miles
16 Off 30 min run Off 30 min run easy walk Off 5 miles
17 Off 30 min run Off 30 min run easy walk Off Half Marathon Race
18 Off 30 min run Off 30 min run easy walk Off 5 miles
19 Off 30 min run Off 30 min run easy walk Off 6-8 miles

Half Marathon – Time Goal for runners

Note: This is the minimum that I’ve found necessary to prepare for the goal. If you are already running more than this amount and are able to recover between workouts, you may continue to do what you are doing—but be careful.

  • I don’t recommend that first-time half marathoners try for a time goal. Run the first one to finish, running mostly at a comfortable training pace.
  • To begin this program, you should have done a long run within the past 2 weeks of at least 5 miles. If your long one is not this long, gradually increase the weekend run to this distance before starting this program.
  • What is my current level of performance? Read the chapter in the book on “Choosing The Right Goal…”. After you have run 3-4 “magic miles” (MM), multiply by 1.2. This tells you what you are currently capable of running in a half marathon right now (at a very hard effort), when the temperature is 60° F or below and when you have done the long runs and speed training listed in the schedule.
  • What pace should I run on the long ones? Take your MM time and multiply by 1.3. Then add 2 minutes. The result is your suggested long run pace per mile on long runs at 60° F or cooler. It is always better to run slower than this pace.
  • Pace the long one so that you aren’t’ huffing and puffing—even at the end.
  • When the temperature rises above 60° F: Slow down by 30 seconds a mile for every 5 degrees above 60° F on long runs and the race itself.
  • Run Walk Run ratio should correspond to the pace used.
    • min/mi—run 4 min/walk 35 seconds
    • min/mi— 4 min run-1 min walk
    • min/mi—-3:1
    • min/mi—2:30-1
    • min/mi—-2:1
    • min/mi—-1:1
    • min/mi—30 sec run/30 sec walk
    • min/mi—30 sec/45 sec
    • min/mi—30 sec/60 sec
  • It is fine to do cross training on Monday, Wednesday and Friday if you wish. There will be little benefit to your running in doing this, but you’ll increase your fat-burning potential. Don’ do exercises like stair machines that use the calf muscle on non-running days.
  • Be sure to take a vacation from strenuous exercise on the day before your weekend runs.
  • At the beginning of the program, after you have run 2 MMs, you can choose a goal that is as fast as 30 seconds per mile faster than predicted by the process indicated in # 3—r any goal that is slower than this. (Read the “leap of faith goal” segment of the “Choosing The Right Pace” chapter.)
  • To prepare for your goal, 800-meter speedwork is included on non-long-run weekends. To compute your pace for the 800-meter (2 laps around a track), take half the time of your goal pace per mile, as you decided according to #10 above, and subtract 15 seconds.
  • Warm up for each 800-meter repeat workout by walking for 5 minutes, then jogging very slowly for 5-10 minutes. Then do 4-8 acceleration-gliders (see the segment about this in “Drills” chapter of Galloway Training book). Reverse this process as your warm down, leaving out the acceleration gliders.
  • Walk 2:30 to 3 min between each 800-meter repeat.
  • At the end of the first lap, walk for 10-30 seconds—but don’t stop your stopwatch. The time for each 800 should be from the start until you finish the second lap.
  • If you have recovered from the weekend workout on Tuesday, run a mile at race pace (noted as “p” on the Tue line). After an easy warmup, run 4 of the cadence drills (CD) and 4 acceleration-gliders (Acg). These are described in the Drill section of my Galloway Training book. Then run a mile segment at goal pace, taking the walk breaks as you plan to do them in the race. Jog for the rest of your run.
  • On long runs and the race itself, slow down when the temperature rises above 60° F: by 30 seconds a mile for every 5 degrees above 60° F or more.
  • It is fine to do cross training on Monday, Wednesday and Friday if you wish. There will be little benefit to your running in doing this, but you’ll increase your fatburning potential. Don’t do exercises like stair machines that use the calf muscle on non-running days.
  • Be sure to take a vacation from strenuous exercise on the day before your weekend runs.

    Have Fun!

Half Marathon Training Schedule for Time Goal Runners

Week Monday Tuesday(CD/Acg/p) Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
1 Off 30 min run Off 30 min run easy walk Off 5 miles
2 Off 35 min run / MM Off 35 min run easy walk Off 6 miles
3 Off 35 min run Off 35 min run easy walk Off 7.5 miles
4 Off 45 min run/MM Off 40 min run easy walk Off 4 x 800
5 Off 45 min run Off 40 min run easy walk Off 9 miles
6 Off 45 min run / MM Off 45 min run easy walk Off 6 x 800
7 Off 45 min run Off 45 min run easy walk Off 11 miles
8 Off 45 min run / MM Off 45 min run easy walk Off 8 x 800
9 Off 45 min run Off 45 min run easy walk Off 13 miles
10 Off 45 min run Off 45 min run easy walk Off 10 x 800
11 Off 45 min run Off 45 min run easy walk Off 15 miles
12 Off 45 min run Off 45 min run easy walk Off 12 x 800
13 Off 45 min run Off 45 min run easy walk Off 17 miles
14 Off 45 min run Off 45 min run easy walk Off Easy 5 Miles / MM
15 Off 45 min run Off 45 min run easy walk Off Golf Half Race
16 Off 45 min run Off 45 min run easy walk Off 4 miles
17 Off 45 min run Off 45 min run easy walk Off 6-12 Miles